Personal Progress

Message from our Health and Wellness Team:
ufekhwhb, Cardiac health rarely gets better by itself. Make it your number one priority. Keep focused on your health goals with frequent visits to this page, and ask your Health Coach to check your cholesterol levels regularly.

 

Weekly Check-In

  Update all or part of your Personal Profile whenever you have new data.
  Cholesterol levels To Do
  Weight To Do
  Blood Pressure To Do
  Health Profile To Do
  Lifestyle Profile To Do
  Nutrition Profile To Do
  Supplements Profile To Do
Next Check-In: Now

How to use and benefit from your personalized content on this page.
Your Personal Progress page gives you the opportunity to use our calculators and health tools. These tools give you advice on where you may need to make improvements for your health and where you're doing just fine. As you make changes to your lifestyle, come back and make changes to your profile and read how those changes have impacted your health and disease status.

Your Personal Progress Report

The key to your success is accurate reporting and regular feedback. Your starting levels, targets, and current levels for your cholesterol, blood pressure, weight, ahnd exercise heart rate are always available right here. The current levels reflect the information you provided during your last check-in. Be sure to check in at least once a week to see how you‘re doing, and read any new recommendations from the Health Expert.

Personal Recommendations for You


Fatty Foods - <at risk>
The level of fatty food intake you have described places you in a higher-risk group for heart disease. Cutting down on fat sources in your diet can lower your risk for heart disease. Although nothing works as well as an inclusively healthy diet, there are supplements you can take to improve your fat ratios. Also, you can make an immediate impact by avoiding some specific foods. Carefully review the nutrition and supplements section of this website.

Refined Carbohydrates - <at risk>
The level of refined carbohydrate intake you described places you in a higher-risk group for heart disease. Refined carbohydrates can be as dangerous for your heart as fatty foods. These "high glucose load" foods affect levels of both cholesterol and c-reactive protein, one of the most reliable indicators of impending cardiovascular disease. Carefully review the nutrition and supplements section.

Exercise - <at Safe Levels>
Congratulations, it appears that you maintain fairly regular schedule of healthy cardiovascular exercise. Keep up the good work. Countless studies have shown how keeping active helps with nearly every aspect of your health, especially heart health, and you're ahead of the crowd. But if you ever find it challenging to keep it up, you might be interested in the tips you'll find in the exercise advice section.

Stress - <at risk>
Your answers place you in a higher risk group for heart disease. It's probably not news to you that stress is bad for your heart. Unfortunately, avoiding stress in today's fast-paced world is virtually impossible. But you can learn to "let go and move on" more quickly. The specific skills are easy to pick up and you'll enjoy using them. In the managing stress section, you may find it's easier than you ever imagined to reduce your stress.

Water - <at risk>
The level of water intake you indicated places you in a higher-risk group. Water is the medium that carries valuable nutrients to every cell, and carries away harmful waste products. The human body is over 97% water, and it needs to be changed continuously. Drinking more water is perhaps the easiest, lowest-cost thing you can do to boost your overall health - and your heart health specifically. So, drink up!

Smoking - <Safe Levels>
You don't smoke. That's good news, as you know. As many as 30% of all heart disease deaths in the United States each year can be attributed to cigarette smoking.

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Use of this site constitutes acceptance of ThinLeader's terms of use and privacy policy. The information provided in this Web site is intended for your general knowledge only, and is not a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. Please see your personal physician immediately if you have any concern about your health, and you should always consult your physician before starting a fitness regimen.